PatchMate Tracker

Daily Routines

When caring for someone with Alzheimer's, it helps to have a routine in place. Structure gives the person with dementia a sense of stability to combat the loss of control they're experiencing at the hands of the disease—calming them and helping to boost their self-esteem. Incorporate activities that he or she enjoys and switch them up throughout the week. You'll want to adjust the activities in rotation to match up with your loved one's skill level, keeping his or her safety in mind.

Activities

When selecting activities to enjoy with your loved one, there are a lot of things to consider.
For example:

  • Your loved one's current level of functioning
  • Activities he or she has always enjoyed or is good at
  • Existing habits can and should be incorporated into the routine. For example, if your loved one always makes the bed at 9 AM, leave that time free
  • Be mindful of any physical limitations (for example, if he or she is hard of hearing, can't see well, or has trouble moving around)
  • Focus on having fun, not on accomplishing anything. It's OK to not finish an activity
  • Consider the time of day. Your loved one might be more successful at certain activities in the morning and others in the afternoon
  • Mild and Moderate Stages

    PHYSICAL

    • Attend exercise and dance classes together
    • Cook together
    • Spend time in nature—walking, gardening, and bird watching
    • Work together on daily tasks (he or she might need more cues during moderate stage)
    • Feed the birds or ducks at the park
    • Do arts-and-crafts projects

    MENTAL

    • Exercise your minds with word games, board games, and puzzles
    • Create a scrapbook together to look back on during later stages
    • Read, watch and discuss current events
    • Play cards or memory games (such as “Name That Tune”)
    • Look through old photo albums together
    • Play matching games
  • Severe Stage

    PHYSICAL

    • Give your loved one soft and textured fabrics to feel and hold
    • Wrap yourselves up in a blanket and snuggle in the sunshine
    • Spend time outdoors in general
    • If possible, take your loved one for car rides
    • Feed him or her foods of varying textures and tastes

    MENTAL

    • Provide stuffed animals for cuddling
    • Keep a memory box full of old photos and nostalgic objects
    • Keep a baby mobile above the person’s bed
  • Mild and Moderate Stages

  • Severe Stage

Safety

As your loved one’s dementia becomes more severe, you will need to take certain safety precautions. See our suggestions below.

To protect the person you care for from:

WANDERING

  • Plan activities and exercise for the times of day when your loved one wanders most
  • Make sure basic needs are met (not hungry, thirsty, or in need of restroom)
  • Avoid busy, disorienting places like shopping malls
  • Install locks near the tops and bottoms of doors
  • Paint doors and knobs to blend in with the walls, or install alarms
  • Restrict fluids two hours before bedtime
  • Try to stick to quiet, low-stress environments

GETTING LOST

  • Keep a list of people to call. Ask them to alert you if your loved one is seen alone
  • Know that right-handed people tend to wander to the right, and vice versa
  • Write down places the person is likely to wander to (old jobs and homes, etc)
  • Enroll your loved one in MedicAlert®+ Alzheimer's Association Safe Return®
  • Write your phone number on your loved one’s Exelon Patch
  • Have the person wear a GPS tracking device like Comfort Zone® or Comfort Zone Check-In® so you can find them faster
  • Spend no more than 15 minutes searching the area before calling 911 to report a missing “vulnerable adult” with Alzheimer’s disease
  • Have a recent, close-up photo and updated medical info on hand for the police
  • Describe what the person is wearing in as much detail as possible
  • File a report with Alzheimer's Association Safe Return® at 1-800-625-3780, even if you are not enrolled
  • Stay put, stay calm and keep your phone within reach

DRIVING

  • Initiate this conversation in the early stage if possible, expressing your concerns and bring up positive, responsible solutions
  • Get the physician to write a letter stating that the person must not drive
  • Acknowledge the person's emotions and that this is a difficult change
  • Keep car keys in a safe, "secret" spot
  • Make sure the person has access to reliable transportation, whether by you, via friends and family, an arranged taxi service or other public transportation
  • Consider public transportation services for older adults, like Elder Care
  • Take your loved one out for scenic drives or train trips
  • Have prescription medications, groceries and meals delivered

ELDER ABUSE AND NEGLECT

Signs the person is being abused or neglected by somebody else:

  • Unexplained physical injuries or bruises
  • He or she expresses feelings of helplessness, seems afraid to talk openly, is fearful in general, is withdrawn, depressed or overly agitated
  • Malnourishment, weight loss, poor hygiene, bedsores, soiled bedding or unmet medical needs
  • Unexpected changes in living arrangements
  • Previously uninvolved or uninterested people appearing in your loved one’s life
  • Financial changes or missing belongings
  • What to do if you suspect abuse or neglect:

    • If you hired the person, fire them
    • Arrange for somebody else to help out
    • If the abuse or neglect is severe enough, alert the police
    • If the person with Alzheimer’s is in danger, call 911
    • You can also call The Adult Protective Services Agency

NOT EATING

  • Offer food at times when the person is least tired or most hungry
  • Choose strong-flavored foods if the person suffers from decreased sensations
  • Substitute milk or cream for water in soups, hot cereals, etc
  • Add butter or olive oil if it doesn’t interfere with other medical conditions
  • Mix non-fat dry milk powder into yogurt, mashed potatoes, and sauces
  • Allow the person to eat with his or her fingers
  • Offer milk and fruit shakes, or puréed baby food options

FALLING

  • When the person has trouble walking, buy a cane, walker, or wheelchair, and remind him or her to use it
  • Encourage exercise to reduce risk but be sure to start slowly
  • If your loved one does fall and you suspect a broken bone, keep them still, wrap them in a blanket, and call 911

Elder Abuse and Neglect

Signs the person is being abused or neglected by somebody else:

  • unexplained physical injuries or bruises
  • he or she expresses feelings of helplessness, seems afraid to talk openly, is fearful in general, is withdrawn, depressed or overly agitated
  • malnourishment, weight loss, poor hygiene, bedsores, soiled bedding or unmet medical needs
  • unexpected changes in living arrangements
  • previously uninvolved or uninterested people appearing in your loved one’s life
  • financial changes or missing belongings
  • What to do if you suspect abuse or neglect:

    • If you hired the person, fire them
    • Arrange for somebody else to help out
    • If the abuse or neglect is severe enough, alert the police
    • If the person with Alzheimer’s is in danger, call 911
    • You can also call The Adult Protective Services Agency

WANDERING

GETTING LOST

DRIVING

ELDER ABUSE AND NEGLECT

FALLING

NOT EATING

FALLING

ELDER ABUSE AND NEGLECT

Helping a person with Alzheimer’s during a crisis:

In case your loved one ever does get lost, here are some tips on approaching the person with Alzheimer’s, to share with your neighbors, friends, and family members:

    • Always approach from the front
    • Explain who you are and why you are speaking to the person
    • Maintain eye contact
    • Speak slowly and calmly
    • Use simple words and only ask "yes" or "no" questions
    • Give the person a reasonable amount of time to respond
    • Try using gestures or actions to communicate if all else fails
    • Do not correct or accuse the person
    • Repeat questions if necessary, but don't change the wording

Talk to the doctor to determine which dosage strength of Exelon Patch is right for your loved one.

Talk to the doctor to determine which dosage strength of Exelon Patch is right for your loved one.

10/15 T-EXP-1318386

full Prescribing Information Patient Product Information www.fda.gov/medwatch Patient Assistance Now full Prescribing Information Patient Product Information www.fda.gov/medwatch Patient Assistance Now

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